Kegel Trainer Exercises to Improve Urinary Incontinence

Kegel Trainer Exercises to Improve Urinary Incontinence

With any physical activity or movement such as exercises, sneezing, coughing, lifting, sexual activity, or laughing you get an increase in intra-abdominal pressure that puts pressure on your bladder. If your pelvic floor muscles are too weak or uncoordinated to oppose that pressure you may experience urinary incontinence.

Biofeedback is often used to strengthen and improve the contraction timing of weak pelvic floor muscles in people with incontinence. The Joy ON Kegel Exerciser, AKA the "Kehel", is a type of biofeedback device. The contraction speed exercises on the Kehel app are the recommended starting place for women with stress incontinence.

Kegel Exercises to Treat Urinary Incontinency

The directions for the contraction speed fishing exercise may be found on the device. Initially, you must contract hard and fast to toss in your fishing pole then contract quickly to reel in your fish. Remember to exhale while contracting and only contract the pelvic floor muscles.

If you find that you are not able to catch fish without contracting your abdominal*, buttocks, or thigh muscles, then you should use the manual training mode until you are strong enough to contract only the pelvic floor muscles and catch the fish.

In the Manual Training exercise mode on the Kehel you can begin by clicking on the Timer in the upper left-hand corner. Set your initial parameters as follows:

  • Number of repetitions: 10
  • Contraction time: 3 seconds
  • Rest time: 6 seconds
  • Position: Lying on your back or side
  • Number of sets: until fatigue
  • How often: 2-3 times per week with Kehel -on other days practice without the Kehel

Begin the session and remember to exhale as you contract (count out loud to be sure you are exhaling) and note the number on the graph in the upper left-hand corner with each contraction. You can tell if you are getting stronger by observing the number on the graph over time. It is important to relax completely between each contraction and the graph number should drop to zero.

You can do consecutive sets of 10 repetitions of this exercise until you begin to fatigue. You will know you are fatiguing when you begin to use your abdominal, buttocks, or thigh muscles to hold the contraction or start holding your breath during the contraction.

Your goal is to perform three sets of 10 repetitions using your pelvic floor muscles before progressing.

If you have problems performing the pelvic floor muscle contraction you may need to ask your doctor for a referral to a pelvic floor physical therapist.

Once you achieve your goal of three sets of 10 repetitions using your pelvic floor muscles you can try to do the contraction speed fishing exercise again. If you are not successful, then you should do the manual training mode with these parameters:

  • Number of repetitions: 10
  • Contraction time: 4 seconds
  • Rest time: 8 seconds
  • Position: Lying on your back or side
  • Number of sets: until fatigue

*Your deep transverse abdominis muscle contracts with the pelvic floor muscles and this is desired. The rectus abdominis is the muscle you do not want to contract, and you can feel this muscle by placing your hand on your belly and monitoring it for movement.

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